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Old 03-19-2004, 11:18 AM   #1
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Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: PNS
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Cap Ii 2.1 (opinions Are Great When You Know The Facts)

What is CAPPS II?

The enhanced Computer Assisted Passenger Prescreening System (CAPPS II) is a limited, automated prescreening system authorized by Congress in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. The system, developed with the utmost concern for individual privacy rights, modernizes the prescreening system currently implemented by the airlines. It will seek to authenticate travelers' identities and perform risk assessments to detect individuals who may pose a terrorist-related threat or who have outstanding Federal or state warrants for crimes of violence.

CAPPS II will become a critical element in TSA's "system of systems" approach to security which includes thorough screening of baggage and passengers by highly trained screeners, fortified cockpit doors in all airliners, thousands of Federal Air Marshals aboard a record number of flights, and armed Federal Flight Deck Officers.

Under CAPPS II, airlines will ask passengers for a slightly expanded amount of reservation information, including full name, date of birth, home address, and home telephone number. With this expanded information, the system will quickly verify the identity of the passenger and conduct a risk assessment utilizing commercially available data and current intelligence information. The risk assessment will result in a recommended screening level, categorized as no risk, unknown or elevated risk, or high risk. The commercially available data will not be viewed by government employees, and intelligence information will remain behind the government firewall. The entire prescreening process is expected to take as little as five seconds to complete.

Once the system has computed a traveler's risk score, it will send an encoded message to be printed on the boarding pass indicating the appropriate level of screening. Eventually, the information relevant to the appropriate screening process is planned to be transmitted directly to screeners at security checkpoints.

In the rare instances where a particular traveler has been identified as having known or suspected links to terrorism or has an outstanding Federal or state warrant for a crime of violence, appropriate law enforcement officers will be notified. A small percentage of passengers will require additional screening at the security checkpoint. The vast majority of travelers will go through the normal screening process.

Under the terms of a competitively awarded contract, Lockheed Martin Management and Data Systems (Lockheed) will assist TSA in developing the passenger risk assessment and prescreening system. Lockheed will develop, integrate, deploy and operate for TSA, a Risk Assessment System through a five year task order contract that provides flexibility to TSA to accomplish the goals as outlined in the Aviation and Transportation Security Act.

How will CAPPS II strengthen homeland security?

A vital element of TSA's layered approach to security is to ensure that travelers who are known or potential threats to aviation are stopped before they or their baggage board an aircraft. CAPPS II is an integral part of that approach. It provides:

A stronger prevention system - CAPPS II will provide a more reliable screening result than is provided by the current airline operated prescreening system. It will seek to authenticate a passenger's identity and conduct a risk assessment. It also allows for updates as new intelligence is received and the threat level is modified.
Shorter waits at checkpoints -- By reducing the number of selectees requiring additional screening, CAPPS II will help speed up the screening process for the vast majority of travelers.
Focus for resources -- CAPPS II will enable DHS to focus its screening resources and as DHS is better able to assess the potential risks to passengers and aircraft, it will be able to allocate resources such as the Federal Air Marshals.

When will CAPPS II be in place?

CAPPS II is scheduled to be implemented after testing and after Congressional requirements are met.

What will CAPPS II mean to the average traveler?

Most passengers will notice little change in the check-in process. Many will actually see improvements. For example, some travelers who receive secondary screening today because they are flagged in the outdated CAPPS I system will no longer be flagged and inconvenienced under the more sophisticated CAPPS II system. CAPPS II will improve aviation security because screening decisions will be more closely aligned with current intelligence information and threat levels.




Myth: CAPPS II will be the first national intelligence gathering database.

Fact: CAPPS II is not an intelligence gathering database. It is a prescreening system that will assess the likelihood that travelers are who they claim to be and perform a risk assessment to detect individuals who may pose a terrorist-related threat or who have outstanding Federal or state warrants for crimes of violence.

CAPPS II modernizes an existing program that was created in 1997 as an additional measure to help prevent a terrorist attack on passenger aircraft. In the wake of September 11th, Congress, through the Aviation and Transportation Security Act (ATSA) directed the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to improve the system.

CAPPS II will only retain data for a short period after the completion of a U.S. person's itinerary. The system simply does two things:

(1) It assesses the identity of every passenger by matching limited information about the traveler (including name, date of birth, address, and phone number) with commercially available information. This check is done between databases outside of a government firewall. CAPPS II will not bring any information contained in the commercial databases into the government's system and the commercial databases are prohibited from keeping or using the information provided by CAPPS II.

(2) CAPPS II also performs a risk assessment, including a check against lists of terrorists and known or suspected threats, to detect individuals who may pose a terrorist-related threat or who have outstanding Federal or state warrants for crimes of violence.

Once the system has computed a traveler's risk score, it will send an encoded message to be printed on the boarding pass indicating the appropriate level of screening. Eventually, this information is planned to be transmitted directly to screeners at security checkpoints.

Myth: Once I buy a plane ticket, CAPPS II will seek out information about my life (travel patterns, purchases, living habits).

Fact: CAPPS II will not use data mining techniques to profile and track citizens. Except for the slightly expanded Passenger Name Record (PNR) data that air carriers and reservation systems will collect, CAPPS II will not collect additional personal information about the traveler. In addition, with rare exceptions, all data created by the CAPPS II system, including risk scores, will be destroyed shortly after the completion of a U.S. person's travel itinerary.

Myth: Once CAPPS II is put in place I will have to submit a significant amount of personal information when I book a flight.

Fact: CAPPS II will require PNR information from the airlines, which will be required to include information such as full name, home address, home phone number, and date of birth.

Myth: Airline employees will be able to view my personal information when I check in for a flight.

Fact: Airline employees already see the PNR that is in an airline's system. The difference with CAPPS II is that airlines will be required to include a passenger's full name, home address, home phone number, and date of birth in the passenger's PNR. The only CAPPS II data to be printed on a passengers' boarding pass will be an encoded field that indicates what level of screening should be conducted.

Myth: If I have bad credit I will be flagged in CAPPS II.

Fact: CAPPS II will not review creditworthiness, as it has no correlation to whether an individual is a terrorist or other security risk.

Myth: If I have moved recently or use a Post Office Box as my address I will be flagged by CAPPS II.

Fact: CAPPS II uses a number of public commercial databases to confirm your identity. A simple address change alone would not elevate an individual's risk score.

Myth: CAPPS II will track where and when I travel and will store that information.

Fact: For U.S. persons, information will only be kept for a short period after completion of the travel itinerary, and then it will be permanently destroyed. The prescreening process will be conducted anew each time you fly.

Myth: If I am flagged for secondary screening I will be questioned by local law enforcement.

Fact: Under the current CAPPS I, certain individuals are already flagged for secondary screening at the TSA checkpoint. Under CAPPS II, a much smaller percentage of all travelers will be flagged for secondary screening by TSA. Furthermore, it is only those who are assessed as a high risk who will be referred to law enforcement, not those flagged for secondary screening.

Myth: If the system flags me as a threat to aviation I will have no recourse to verify that I am not a threat.

Fact: With CAPPS II, there will be a redress process established, to include a Passenger Advocate. The Passenger Advocate will focus on assisting passengers who feel that they have been incorrectly or consistently prescreened. Since CAPPS II will be a centralized government-run system, rather than a decentralized system implemented by over 70 airlines, CAPPS II will provide the opportunity for a more efficient and effective disposition of passenger complaints. The passenger authentication process that CAPPS II will provide will eliminate many of the mistaken identity situations that airline travelers currently face under the pre-screening system that the airlines now operate.

Myth: CAPPS II will use racial profiling to identify travelers who pose a threat.

Fact: CAPPS II will absolutely not profile based on race, ethnicity, religion or physical appearance.

Myth: Contractors working for TSA will be able to use my personal information for commercial or for-profit uses (for example, sell my personal information to car companies).

Fact: TSA contactors are contractually prohibited from selling or retaining a passenger's personal information for commercial purposes.

Myth: CAPPS II will run a criminal background check on every passenger.

Fact: No, CAPPS II will NOT run a criminal background check on every passenger. Instead, CAPPS II will perform an identity authentication and a risk assessment. Specifically, CAPPS II will do two things:

It will assess the identity of every passenger by matching limited information about the traveler, including name, date of birth, address, and phone number, with commercially available information. This check is done between databases outside of a government firewall. CAPPS II will not bring any information contained in the commercial databases into the government's system.

CAPPS II also performs a risk assessment, including a check against lists of terrorists and known or suspected threats, to detect individuals who may pose a terrorist-related threat or who have outstanding Federal or state warrants for crimes of violence.

Myth: If a passenger has several speeding tickets or misdemeanors on his/her record, does this mean that he or she cannot fly?

Fact: No, a speeding ticket or misdemeanor in and of itself will not bar a passenger from flying. CAPPS II will assess a passenger's identity and perform a risk assessment. The aggregated information will determine screening level. In the rare instances where a particular traveler has been identified as having known or suspected links to terrorism, or an outstanding warrant for violent criminal behavior, appropriate law enforcement officers will be notified.

Myth: TSA cannot move forward in its plans for CAPPS II until the GAO report that Congress requested is issued on Feb. 15.

Fact: The current legislation states that TSA can move forward in testing CAPPS II. CAPPS II is scheduled to be implemented after testing and after Congressional requirements are met.

Myth: CAPPS II can be easily thwarted by identity fraud.

Fact: The CAPPS II design includes an information-based identity assessment process similar to what is done today in the commercial sector when, for example, a person purchases a cellular telephone, opens a bank account, or acquires a credit card. This is a substantial addition to the current identity verification process
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Old 09-01-2007, 10:35 PM   #2
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You may want to get the process started before you move to the USA.

Visa notice: Taking flight training without an appropriate visa could be a violation of your immigration status and could result in your arrest and removal from the United States; therefore, it is important that you have a visa that permits you to take flight training in the United States. If you do not possess the correct visa, or if you have questions pertaining to your visa status or the appropriate visas for flight training, please contact your local Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services at 800/375-5283 or USCIS Home Page

Candidate Notifies Flight School. The flight training candidate should provide advanced notice to the flight school that he or she intends to start flight training.

Flight School Registers. After the candidate notifies the flight school of their intent to start flight training, the flight school needs to register online with TSA at https://www.flightschoolcandidates.gov/fsindex.html.

Candidate Applies for Training.
Use the TSA student registration page at https://www.flightschoolcandidates.gov and continues the application process.

The candidate will be required to submit the following information:

* Background Information. Full name, gender, current address and five-year address history, date and country of birth, and citizenship information.
* TSA Identification Number. The TSA identification number is not given to the candidate. Rather, it is an internal designator only seen by TSA.
* Passport and Visa Information. Foreign applicants are required to have a passport. A candidate may either scan his or her complete passport and submit it to TSA electronically, or copy his or her complete passport and fax it to TSA using the fax number provided on the AFSP Web site.
* Training Details. Basic information including the name of the school, course name, course description and ID number, type of aircraft, pilot certificate or rating sought, and the start and end dates for the flight training. If the flight school is already registered with TSA, it might be helpful if the candidate brings his or visa and passport and registers at the flight school. This will allow the flight school to upload the required documents to TSA and also to make copies for the flight school's record-keeping requirements.

The candidate training request status is available on the AFSP candidate home page at https://www.flightschoolcandidates.gov. Each training request the candidate has entered into the system is listed in the Current Flight
Training Applications section of the AFSP home page after login.

Fingerprints. American Association of Airport Executives at 703/797-2550. has reported that it is not issuing fingerprinting forms to candidates, only flight schools and instructors. Your fingerprints will be reviewed by the FBI which will help run a background check on you.
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